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Blog : Use Spring Insight Developer to Analyze Code, Install it with Tomcat, and Extend it with Plugins

posted by duncwinn on December 4, 2012 01:33 PM

People are still discovering the benefits of the free tool from VMware SpringSource, called Spring Insight Developer. This post provides an explanation of what Spring Insight Developer does, how to set it up with Apache Tomcat, and an example of available plugins.  For a better visual, there is also a video of the new Spring Insight 1.8.3 GUI embedded below.

Spring Insight is an extremely useful, time-saving, free tool for Spring developers and also has plugins for Grails, GemFire, Hadoop, Hibernate, JMS, JNDI, LDAP, MongoDB, RabbitMQ, Redis, Spring Batch, Spring Integration, Tomcat, and many more on Github.  In the latest release of Spring Insight, VMware introduced a new "split-agent" architecture that will enable this tool to be extended to more runtime languages besides Java, such as .NET, Ruby, PHP, Python, etc. There is also a bounty program where you can get paid to develop new plugin or offer to pay others.

What does Spring Insight Do?

In a nutshell, Spring Insight Developer lets you see what your code is doing. When, as a developer, you press a button in your application’s GUI, you can see what Java code is invoked, how it translates into SQL, and quite a bit more. Before we show it in action, it’s worth mentioning a few of the benefits.

Let’s take a look at a simple example of tracing your app, viewing the details, and seeing the code in action.

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Developers, Operations | architecture, arguments, AspectJ

Blog : Basic Apache Tomcat clustering for Grails applications

posted by pledbrook on July 20, 2010 06:43 AM

Grails is a rapid application development framework for web applications on the Java platform. It's similar in many respects to Ruby on Rails, but it's based on Java libraries, like Spring and Hibernate, and the Groovy language. It also produces standard WAR files that can be deployed to a servlet container like Tomcat. That means you can deploy Grails applications to a Tomcat cluster and in this article I'll show you how.

Getting started

In order to demonstrate clustering, we need an application to deploy. Assuming that Grails is installed (I was using Grails 1.3.3 - the latest) we can create a brand new application with the command

grails create-app my-cluster-app

This will create a my-cluster-app directory containing the project. If we then switch to that directory, we can generate a WAR file straight away by running

grails war

Of course, the application doesn't do anything yet. Nor is it ready for clustering.

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Developers, Operations | clustering, Grails, Tomcat Configuration

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