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Blog : Year in Review 2011

posted by Stacey Schneider on January 4, 2012 07:31 AM

2011 has been a great year for the Tomcat Expert community. After almost 2 years of operating, the Tomcat Expert has hit its stride, unloading an array of new information, as well as keeping you up to date with the newest releases for Apache Tomcat 6 and Apache Tomcat 7. With the addition of two new Tomcat Expert Contributors, (Channing Benson and Daniel Mikusa), the Tomcat Expert community continues to build on its reputation for being the leading source for fresh perspectives and new information on how to best leverage Apache Tomcat in the enterprise.

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Developers, Executives | Cross-site Scripting, Java Development, Parallel Deployment

Blog : 4 Mistakes To Avoid On Apache Tomcat

posted by mthomas on August 3, 2011 06:50 AM

As a VMware engineer dedicated to building Apache Tomcat and vFabric tc Server , I get the opportunity to see a lot of issues across the official Apache Tomcat public mailing lists, as well as VMware’s private professional support queue for both Apache Tomcat and tc Server. Typical of any software issue tracker, many of the issues logged could be avoided with a little better understanding of the Tomcat applications. Here are a few tips that may be useful to keep in mind:

Understanding Global vs Application Context.xml Files

There are two different types of context.xml files: one is global, and the other is specific to each web application. The problem with editing the global context.xml file is, as its name implies, that it affects every web application running on that Tomcat instance. So for instance, if you have 10 web applications, and create a new JNDI datasource with 50 connections to the database in the global context.xml file, you have essentially created 10 JNDI datasources with a total of 500 connections to your database and have likely completely overwhelmed your database. If you want to add a datasource to a single application, by remembering to create the datasource in the application level context.xml file, you can avoid serious performance problems.

Creating a Single Global Datasource for Application Sharing

Occasionally companies will deploy 3 or 4 related applications on a Tomcat server that are designed to share a single datasource. As described above, placing the datasource definition either once in the global context.xml file or in 3 or 4 application specific context.xml files will always create multiple instances of that datasource. To truly share a single datasource, it is necessary to put the definition of the datasource into the server.xml file, and then place a single resource link into the global context.xml file. This link ensures only one instance of the datasource is ever created and when any application goes to use it, it always uses the same single instance.

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Developers, Operations | Java Development, Tomcat Admin, Tomcat Configuration

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