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Blog : Basic Apache Tomcat clustering for Grails applications

posted by pledbrook on July 20, 2010 06:43 AM

Grails is a rapid application development framework for web applications on the Java platform. It's similar in many respects to Ruby on Rails, but it's based on Java libraries, like Spring and Hibernate, and the Groovy language. It also produces standard WAR files that can be deployed to a servlet container like Tomcat. That means you can deploy Grails applications to a Tomcat cluster and in this article I'll show you how.

Getting started

In order to demonstrate clustering, we need an application to deploy. Assuming that Grails is installed (I was using Grails 1.3.3 - the latest) we can create a brand new application with the command

grails create-app my-cluster-app

This will create a my-cluster-app directory containing the project. If we then switch to that directory, we can generate a WAR file straight away by running

grails war

Of course, the application doesn't do anything yet. Nor is it ready for clustering.

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Developers, Operations | clustering, Grails, Tomcat Configuration

Blog : Scalable, Cloud-friendly Apache Tomcat Sessions with RabbitMQ: Part II

posted by jbrisbin on July 1, 2010 06:12 AM

In my first article on taking advantage of RabbitMQ's asynchronous messaging to implement a cloud-friendly session manager, I covered the method behind the madness and introduced you to some of the functions a session manager has to perform in the course of doing its job. In this, the second of two articles covering this topic, I'll describe how loading and updating session objects is handled and, in the interest of fairness, give some disclaimers and acknowledge the trade-offs made to get here.

The Code (at 1,000 feet) cont'd

Whenever code wants to interact with a user session, whether that be to load it into its own memory or to replicate attributes on that session, it sends these messages to a queue whose name contains the session ID. The pattern used to create the queue name is configurable so you can partition user sessions by application, or even by something more fine-grained (without resorting to using multiple, non-clustered RabbitMQ servers).

The session store first checks its internal Map to see if the requested session happens to be local to this store. If it is, the store simply hands that session back to the manager. If it's not, then the store sends a "load" message to the session's queue. It doesn't just fire off a message, though. It turns out that a user's session can be requested from the store many times during the course of a request. If one were to send a load message every time this happens, then we would see a serious performance degradation. To get around this, before a load message is sent, the store checks to see if it's already trying to load this session. If it is, it simply waits until that process is finished and uses the session being loaded in that other thread.

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Developers, Operations | cloud computing, clustering, RabbitMQ

Blog : Clustering Cloud-friendly Apache Tomcat Sessions with RabbitMQ: Part I

posted by jbrisbin on June 21, 2010 07:11 AM

The existing solutions for Tomcat session clustering are viable for moderate clusters and straightforward failover in traditional deployments. Several are well developed with a mature code-base, such as Apache's own multicast clustering. But there's no getting around the fact that today's cloud architectures place new and different expectations on Tomcat that didn't exist several years ago when those solutions were being written. In cloud architectures, where horizontal scalability is king, a dozen or more Tomcat instances is not unusual.

In my hybrid, private cloud, first described in my earlier post on keeping track of the availability and states of services across the cloud, I wanted to fully leverage all my running Tomcat instances on every user request. I didn't want to use sticky sessions as I wanted each request (including AJAX requests on a page) to be routed to a different application server. This is how virtual machines work at a fundamental level. Increased throughput is obtained by parallelizing as much of the work as possible and utilizing more of the available resources. I wanted the same thing for my dynamic pages. Not finding a solution in the wild, I resolved to roll my own session manager. The result is the "vcloud" (or virtual cloud) session manager. I've Apache-licensed the source code and put it on GitHub--mostly to try and elicit free help to make it better. You can find the source code here: http://github.com/jbrisbin/vcloud/tree/master/session-manager/

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Developers, Operations | cloud computing, clustering, RabbitMQ

Knowledge Base : Optimizing and Tuning Apache Tomcat

posted by SpringSource on April 8, 2010 12:06 PM

For development and operations teams, a presentation that covers approaches for optimizing and tuning Apache Tomcat.

As Tomcat takes on greater roles in enterprise environments, proper tuning and optimization becomes “top of mind” for all stakeholders as well as IT developers and operations teams.  Key approaches and processes are laid out to help understand the process to ensure Tomcat runs successfully and with performance.

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| clustering, deployment, measure

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